Start Facebook and dating sites

Facebook and dating sites

Did you ever go out on a date and wished you were home watching TV and just relaxing because you had such a lousy time? Really, when you think about it, why shouldn't it be like this?

Most people join Facebook to connect with family and friends. Never, ever agree to follow links to a website you are not sure about (if they tell you to do this) and never send money to someone you don't know. Take care with how much information you give away - no matter how nice they seem.

In both cases the claims were erroneous, an expression of the mistaken belief the use of some simple legal talisman — knowing enough to ask the right question or post a pertinent disclaimer — will immunize one from some undesirable legal consequence. First off, the “problem” this ineffective solution supposedly addresses is a non-existent one: Facebook isn’t claiming copyright to the personal information, photographs, and other material that their users are posting to the social network, nor have they announced any plans that would make all Facebook posts public (even previously deleted ones) regardless of a user’s privacy settings): In response to rumors about copyright issues that began circulating in November 2012 after Facebook announced they were considering revoking users’ rights to vote on proposed policy changes, the company issued a statement noting that: There is a rumor circulating that Facebook is making a change related to ownership of users’ information or the content they post to the site. Anyone who uses Facebook owns and controls the content and information they post, as stated in our terms.

They control how that content and information is shared. Click here to learn more: worried that] Facebook will own their photos or other media are posting [a frightful message] — unaware that it is a hoax. “We have noticed some statements that suggest otherwise and we wanted to take a moment to remind you of the facts — when you post things like photos to Facebook, we do not own them,” Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes said in a statement.

“Under our terms you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings.” Brad Shear, a Washington-area attorney and blogger who is an expert on social media, said the message [that Facebook users are posting to their walls is] “misleading and not true.” He said that when you agree to Facebook’s terms of use you provide Facebook a “non-exclusive, transferable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any content you post.