Start Fender squire dating cae

Fender squire dating cae

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To my ears, it has that single coil twang on the bridge and that sort of ?

Squier is the launching pad for beginners, pointing intermediate and advancing guitarists toward their ultimate goal-owning a Fender!

Fender Musical Instruments Corporation entered the picture in the 1950s, when the V. Squier Company began supplying Southern California inventor and businessman Leo Fender with strings for his unusual new electric guitars. Before the Fender Squier line of guitars was introduced in 1982, Fender was making lower priced guitars such as the Fender Lead series at its Fullerton, California plant.

When Squier versions of these instruments appeared, demand for them as the "official" cost-conscious alternatives was immediate, and a brand name was reborn. B." Squier, a young English immigrant who arrived in Battle Creek, Mich., in the latter part of the 19th century, was a farmer and shoemaker who had learned the fine European art of violin making. Squier violin, banjo and guitar strings became well known nationwide and were especially popular among students because of their reasonable price.

At the time, many other established brands offered affordable copies of classic Fender models including the Stratocaster®, Telecaster®, Precision Bass® and Jazz Bass® guitars. Victor Squier started making his own hand-wound violin strings, and the business grew so quickly that he and his employees improvised a dramatic production increase by converting a treadle sewing machine into a string winder capable of producing 1,000 uniformly high-quality strings per day.

Jerome Bonaparte Squier, a young English immigrant who arrived in Battle Creek, Michigan, in the latter part of the 19th century, was a farmer and shoemaker who had learned the fine European art of violin making. Victor Squier started making his own hand-wound violin strings, and the business grew so quickly that he and his employees improvised a dramatic production increase by converting a treadle sewing machine into a string winder capable of producing 1,000 uniformly high-quality strings per day.